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Editorial: The Case for Entrepreneurship in Biomedical Engineering Education (Dr. Mansoor Nasir)

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Entrepreneurship_in_BME

Read it all here: Austin J Biomed Eng. 2014;1(2): 1.

WJR Interview (Dr. Eric Meyer and Dr. Mansoor Nasir)

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Dr. Meyer  Eric Meyer talkes to WJR

Click Here to listen to the WJR Interview: Eric Meyer


Dr. Mansoor Nasir talks about the Biomedical Engineering Senior Projects and the collaboration between Industrial Sponsor (Gorden Maniere – Advanced Amputee Solutions) and the Biomedical Engineering students.

Listen to this WJR interview: Mansoor Nasir

 

 

 

 

 

 

More interviews from Lawrence Tech BME Students featured on WJR:

Click Here:  Lindsay Petku  

Click Here:  Akaram Alsamarae

 

Of Biosensors: Telling Your POCs from LOCs and EIS from EC by Dr. Mansoor Nasir

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Dr. Mansoor Nasir

Dr. Mansoor Nasir

“Medical device” is a catch-all term that can include anything and everything from prosthetics and diagnostic instruments to imaging and therapeutic devices. Sometimes, these are also referred to as “biosensors.” However, the

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term biosensor is more commonly used for specific devices or techniques that can qualitatively and quantitatively detect targets of interest. The targets include pathogens, DNA or some other specific protein, or a molecule. Examples of some of the most widely used medical devices that also qualify as biosensors are pregnancy tests, glucose sensors, and environmental sensors.

Of the aforementioned example, pregnancy tests and glucose sensors also qualify as Point-of-Care (POC) diagnostic devices. POCs are all the rage these days. To many, they espouse images of Tricorders and other instruments that might show up in an episode of Star Trek (Trekkie here) in the hands of Dr. McCoy. However, to a ‘serious’ BME student, they represent medical devices that can do the testing and analyze and present the data onsite were patient is located. This could be under supervision of a medical practitioner but certainly, one of the reasons for the success of pregnancy tests and glucose sensors is their ease of use and easy interpretation of results by layfolk.

In the research community, another term that is commonly used for a type of biosensor is a Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) device (also called Micro Total Analysis System or mTAS). While similar in concept to POCs, LOCs are more sophisticated in their architecture and sensing capabilities. The might include fluidic conduits (sometimes referred to as microfluidics) and a variety of sensing modalities, such as optical, electrical, electrochemical, or acoustic, to

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name a few. Some may also include instrumentation and signal conditioning components. The holy grail in LOCs is a complete platform that can take a raw sample, filter and separate it into constituents, and then selectively identify and/or analyze the target, all on a device no bigger than a credit card.

Figure 1. (Left) First commercially available Glucose Biosensor (YSI 23A)*. (Right) A 3mm-long glucose sensor under development at Lawrence Technological University in Dr. Kandaswamy’s lab. Notice the drive toward miniaturization.

Figure 1. (Left) First commercially available Glucose Biosensor (YSI 23A)*. (Right) A 3mm-long glucose sensor under development at Lawrence Technological University in Dr. Kandaswamy’s lab. Notice the drive toward miniaturization.

LOC devices are attractive in part because they can work with extremely small sample volumes and have very fast detection times. Integrating so many functionalities on a single platform is tremendously challenging and many such devices still require bulky pumps and instrumentation and the end result is almost never the size of a credit card.

This is nowhere truer than in the case of biosensors based on fluorescent tagging. While fluorescent sensors set the bar for high sensitivity for bio/molecular detection, they require bulky measurement setup. Perhaps more importantly, these sensors require the need to label the target with fluorescent molecules. This introduces a host of new issues, such as selectivity and non-specific binding, which can introduce error in measured signal. In many cases, the required reagents are also temperature or light sensitive. The result is that fluorescent biosensors are not cost effective and also not easily miniaturized. Here electrical biosensors have an advantage as they rely solely on the measurement of voltages or currents for detection. The main advantage for studying impedance biosensors is their ability to perform label-free detection. While there are many variations of electrical sensors, the mostly commonly used techniques measure change in impedance or conductivity in the presence of the target. Further information about the target can be elicited if the frequency is also varied while holding the amplitude of the electrical stimulus constant. This technique is called Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS).

Figure 2. The figure shows an example of an impedance-based sensor made by using a micromachined Plexiglas flow channel that interfaces with a glass slide with microfabricated gold electrodes. There are two inlets and one outlet. The flow-rate ratio between sheath (faster) and sample (slower) fluids controls the sensitivity of this sensor.

Figure 2. The figure shows an example of an impedance-based sensor made by using a micromachined Plexiglas flow channel that interfaces with a glass slide with microfabricated gold electrodes. There are two inlets and one outlet. The flow-rate ratio between sheath (faster) and sample (slower) fluids controls the sensitivity of this sensor.

My research interests lie in the area of EIS but combine it with microfluidic sensor technology with the goal of rapid identification of chemical and biological threats. By using microchannels with different architectures as well as changing the flow rates of laminar fluid streams, impedance sensors with tunable sensitivity can be achieved. Working on such projects requires expertise from a multidisciplinary team with expertise in surface modification, microfabrication, and bioinstrumentation. Future research efforts will focus on extending the detection to a multielectrode system for impedance-based imaging systems.

There is considerable potential for incorporating such ideas in classroom teaching. A new BME course (BME4093), offered in Spring 2013, will focus on with various medical device technologies, including commercialized products such as the glucose sensor. EIS research includes elements of circuit design, electrochemical (EC) response of electrodes in electrolytic solutions, as well as bioinstrumentation for signal amplification and filtering. Students in the Bioelectrical Engineering Physics course (BME 4503) offered this semester learned about the theory behind EIS. In short, impedance biosensors have the potential for not only the development of simple, label-free detection of biosensors but can also be valuable tools in teaching students about some fundamental principles of biosensing platforms based on electrical measurements.

 

ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition in Seattle, WA

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The ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition is the only conference dedicated to all disciplines of engineering education. The conference’s main focus is to promote the exchange of ideas among the different teaching staff on the different teaching methods and curriculum they find best. It is a chance for all to share new ideas and gain knowledge from others. The BME department here at LTU attended the conference.

We had two presentations and a poster:

 

FostIMG_4431ering the entrepreneurial mindset through the development of multidisciplinary learning modules based on the ”Quantified Self” social movement
Dr. Eric G Meyer and Dr. Mansoor Nasir

Quantified Self

Enhancing undergraduate education through research-based learning: a longitudinal case study
Dr. Yawen Li

Li2015-Research_based_learning_final_paper

Providing Diverse Opportunities for Capstone Projects in Biomedical Engineering

Dr. Mansoor Nasir, Dr. Eric G Meyer and Dr. Yawen Li

                                                    Final_Paper_ASEE2015_MNasir

Quantified-Self (QS) Roadshow – LTU Edition

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Dr. Mansoor Nasir and Dr. Eric Meyer hosted 13 faculty members from Lawrence Tech, Kettering University and Ohio Northern in the first event of the Quantified-Self Roadshow seriesFaculty from the original KEEN Topical Grant on Quantified self (PI: Dr. Eric Meyer) ) shared the modules focusing on Entrepreneurial Mindset  Learning (EML) from various engineering and science fields. The roadshow is part of a KEEN Topical Network Grant (PI: Dr. Mansoor Nasir) that is being leveraged to disseminate classroom resources for EML and student engagement around the QS theme. LTU is taking the lead in building the network of faculty and is sharing resources at a dedicated website qsl4eml.ltu.edu.

QsWorkshop (1) QsWorkshop (3) QSWorkshop (5)

The half-day mini-workshop also included a great presentation by a guest speaker, Dr. Daniel Johnson, who is commercializing a powered exoskeleton for the lumbar spine through a local startup venture, Exodynamics. Student from various departments and workshop faculty attended the presentation where Dr. Johnson shared his experiences about entrepreneurship and in commercializing a new technology.

QSworkshop (4)

KEEN Provides a Grant to Update BME Courses

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Dr. Meyer and Dr. Nasir have been working on updating some key courses of the BME curriculum to give students more real world examples of BME related topics. One of these topics is the improvement and development of quantified self (QS) devices. These devices are a result of the public wanting to keep track of their personal health using hand held devices that monitor their: heart rate, calories burned, speed, steps taken and many other data points that monitor your performance. KEEN has provided a grant to Dr. Meyer and Dr. Nasir to improve the BME curriculum using QS. Students will be exposed to new ideas and technologies throughout their courses at LTU. The professors are trying to get students to look at and solve real world problems with confidence in their early years in the BME program. With help from KEEN, they can now provide the knowledge required to provide new projects in the classroom to better prepare students.

 

QS4EML-license-plate-final

http://qs4eml.ltu.edu/ (QS Project)

http://keennetwork.org/blog/?p=2580 (KEEN Blog Post)

BME Professors Host Faculty Workshop

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During the past year Dr.  Meyer and Dr.  Nasir have used Quantied-Self (QS), a popular social movement that uses technology to record data on all aspects of people’s lives (diet, exercise, sleep, insulin levels, etc.) to weave entrepreneurship into the biomedical engineering curriculum.

On Friday, April 24, 2015 they are hosting a faculty workshop that will cover the methodology for implementation of entrepreneurial minded learning in specific examples of course modules. Other faculty from LTU and Kettering University that have used the QS theme in their classes will also share their experiences.

http://qs4eml.ltu.edu/

QS4EML-license-plate-finalKeenLogo

BME Presentations and Posters at LTU Research Day 2015

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Lawrence Technological University’s Research Day is an annual event held to bring faculty and students together to foster a culture of interdisciplinary research. This year, the Biomedical Engineering department had three presentations and three posters on display for Research Day 2015.

Presentations given:

“Gait Analysis for Early Fall Prediction”
Mansoor Nasir, PhD, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Akram AlSamarae, BS Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Lindsay Petku, BS Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

“Increased Primary Stability and Bone-Implant Contact with a Novel Osteotomy Preparation Technique Termed Osseodensification”
Eric Meyer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Daniel Greenshields, MS in Mechanical Engineering Candidate, College of Engineering
Salah Huwais, DDS, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

“Application of Piezoelectric Polymer Film to Sensing and Actuation within Microfluidic Systems”
Michael Moeller, BS Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Mansoor Nasir, PhD, Assist Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
James A. Mynderse, PhD, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering

BME Presentations

 

BME Presentations2

Posters on display:

“Additive Manufacturing as a Viable Alternative for Production of Stainless Steel Tools”
Kevin Mozurkewich, BS in Biomedical Engineering Candidate, College of Engineering
Eric Meyer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

“Effect of Industrial Projectile Impact on a Surrogate Head-Form: Implications for Industrial Work Injuries”
Akram Alsamarae, BS Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Brian Weaver, BS Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Stephanie Rossman, Doctor of Engineering Candidate, Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering
Eric Meyer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

“Novel Design of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury Prevention Brace”
Daniel Greenshields, MS in Mechanical Engineering Candidate, College of Engineering
Rachel Porter, BS in Biomedical Engineering Candidate, College of Engineering
Justin Killewald, BS in Biomedical Engineering Candidate, College of Engineering
Eric Meyer, PhD, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

BME Posters

BME Posters2

BME Posters3

BME Innovating Curriculum with Entrepreneurial-Mindset (ICE) Workshop – 03/27/2015

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Lawrence Tech and Bucknell hosted a workshop on innovative curriculum with entrepreneurial-mindset (ICE) on 03/27/2015. With attendance from more than 20 faculty from 9 different KEEN network institutions, the event was a huge success. The workshop attendees explored ideas and shared their experience on how entrepreneurial minded learning can be embedded into the biomedical curriculum.

The workshop included a keynote presentation from Dr. Jack Linehan who is a professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University. He also serves as the consulting professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University, and Advisor to BioInnovate Ireland, NUI-Galway. He was a past Vice President of the Whitaker Foundation and is a fellow and past President of the Biomedical Engineering Society and past president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. In 2006, Dr. Linehan was elected to the National Academy of Engineering.

The medical device design process has many restrictions and challenges, according to Joseph Tranquillo, Associate Professor at Bucknell University. Learning to create opportunities does not come naturally. It comes through experience. Biomedical engineering programs need to teach students how to address these challenges.

Dr. Linehan’s experiences with BMEIdea, Bioinnovate and Enterprise Ireland and other medical technology innovation programs have emphasized training entrepreneurs to define a needs statement that focuses on the goal, not the problem. The alternative is “luckovation” and hoping that the product development solution matches someone’s need.

The formal approaches to entrepreneurial mindset (Creativity, Curiosity and Creating Value) are implemented though engineering skills that were highlighted by Steve Hasbrook, Program Director from KEEN. He also supported the idea that industry wants to hire “T-shaped” engineers who have a deep technical foundation, but with broad communication and collaboration abilities.

In addition to the common themes presented at the workshop, Donald Carpenter, Professor and Co-PI of Lawrence Tech’s KEEN Institutional Grant described how entrepreneurship is being embedded throughout the College of Engineering and the University. Specific to the Biomedical Engineering curriculum, Eric Meyer, Assistant Professor presented how a KEEN Topical grant supported entrepreneurship modules based on the “Quantified Self” theme that were embedded into core classes and Mansoor Nasir, Assistant Professor described some of the challenges in creating capstone project opportunities for seniors.

There were many additional distinguished faculty from KEEN Universities that presented, including; Jay Goldberg, Professor at Marquette University and Michael Rust, Associate Professor at Western New England who discussed specific courses that they have developed, as well as Glenn Gaudette, Associate Professor at Worchester Polytechnic, Jennifer Currey, Assistant Professor at Union, and Patrick Atkinson, Professor at Kettering who discussed strategies for involving clinicians in biomedical engineering projects.

BME_ICEWrkshp (1) BME_ICEWrkshp (7) BME_ICEWrkshp (4) BME_ICEWrkshp (6) BME_ICEWrkshp (8) BME_ICEWrkshp (9) BME_ICEWrkshp (10) 

In pictures: From top left Dr. Patrick Atkinson (Kettering University), Dr. Glenn Gaudette (WPI), Dr. Jennifer Currey (Union College), Dr. Eric Meyer (BME – LTU), Dr. Mansoor Nasir (BME – LTU), Dr. Mehrdad Zadeh (Kettering), Dr. Ben Kelley (Baylor University)

Science and Engineering Fair of Metropolitan Detroit

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The 58th Annual Science and Engineering Fair of Metropolitan Detroit (SEFMD) was held from March 10 through March 14, 2015 in the Michigan Hall of the Cobo Conference Exhibition Center in downtown Detroit. The Biomedical Engineering Department’s very own Dr. Nasir was one of the judges.

Dr. Nasir Judging

The judges had the opportunity to view and evaluate a number of exhibits, especially some interesting projects in areas pertinent to IEEE fields of interest. The judges and the high school students in the Senior Division had the pleasure to interface and discuss in depth some of the principles, scientific techniques, engineering approach, experimental results and applications pertinent to the projects.

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