Archive

For the NEWSLETTERS!! category

Novel Design of a Three‐Dimensional Biomimetic Nanofiber Scaffold: Applications in Ligament Tissue Engineering – Spring 2013 Newsletter

Comments Off on Novel Design of a Three‐Dimensional Biomimetic Nanofiber Scaffold: Applications in Ligament Tissue Engineering – Spring 2013 Newsletter

Team Members: John Schoenbeck, Christopher Lach, Reem Daher‐Nahhas

Faculty Advisor : Dr. Yawen Li

A commonly injured ligament in young adults that leads to degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis is the Anterior Cruciate  Ligament (ACL) of the knee. Tissue Engineering has taken numerous steps in the past decade towards developing in‐vitro grown  ssue gras for the replacement of diseased and damaged ligaments. Previous research has shown that three‐dimensionally  paerned electrospun poly(ε‐caprolactone, PCL) nanofibers hold vast potenal as a biodegradable scaffold material for ligament  ssue engineering. The purpose of this research is to establish and characterize a novel braided scaffold design for use in ligament ssue engineering applicaons. In this study, a second-order triple helix braid concept was designed to mimic the hierarchal structure of collagen found in nave ACL tissues. Structural properties were analyzed using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and porosimetry. Mechanical properes were characterized via tensile failure tesng. Cell compatibility was  determined by analyzing statically cultured cell‐seeded scaffolds via Live/Dead and AlamarBlue assays. Data analysis yields several promising outcomes: The structure of the braided scaffold closely mimics the structure of nave collagen and contains pores  that provide an ideal environment for cell growth. The mechanical properes of the braid match the ACL properes from literature and exceed those of previously aempted 3D fiber designs. Braid samples also prove to be compable with ligament fibroblasts in short‐term culture. The experimental protocols developed for this research will enable future studies to rapidly develop  new fiber braiding paerns and characterize their viability as ssue engineering scaffolds.

Sensor for detection of early onset of dehydration and heatstroke in athletes – Spring 2013 Newsletter

Comments Off on Sensor for detection of early onset of dehydration and heatstroke in athletes – Spring 2013 Newsletter

Team Members: Lorraine Novak, Kevin Mason, Mahew West, Wesley Bellman.

Faculty Advisor : Dr. Mansoor Nasir

Heat stroke due to exeron is the third leading cause of on‐the‐field sudden death in athletes.  According to a USA today arcle,  deaths from heat related injuries for athletes has more than doubled since 1975. The combinaon of hot weather and intense  exercise makes athletes vulnerable to injuries such as heat stroke and dehydraon. Some of the physiological condions in queson are rapid heart rate, high body temperature, and dehydraon. Our group is developing a sensor system that will measure  the heart rate, core body temperature, and electrolyc content of sweat to monitor signs of dehydraon and heat stroke. Heart  rate will be measured through electrodes connected to our designed electrocardiogram (ECG) circuit  that  will  feed  the  signal  into  a  microcontroller.  The signal will be exported to Matlab soware where heart rate calculaons will take place.  Core body temperature will be measured through  replicaon of ground‐breaking research conducted in Japan which created an external circuit capable of measuring and calculang core body temperature using the zero‐heat‐flow method. Electrolyc content of sweat is being determined by  measuring sweat conducvity – its ability to carry  current – by placing a small sample of sweat over  an array of four electrodes which will apply a constant current as well as measure the voltage drop  across the sample. The successful design and funconing of each of these components will prove to  be a monumental step toward our ulmate goal  of incorporang these sensors in a wearable device that will allow medical staff and athletes to take appropriate acon and prevent serious heat related injuries.

Athlete sensor

The physiological sensor consists of a conductivity sensor, ECG measurements and core body temperature sensor. The results from all three is sent to a microcontroller and then read on a laptop.

 

Blue Taste Theme created by Jabox